NEW update: Master Your mind online course is open!

Work With Me

1:1 Coaching

Work directly with Ryan – includes weekly phone calls, giving you a high performance coach in your corner.

Work with ryan

Better Human Workshops

New dates and locations for 2020 will be announced soon. To request or host an event in your area click below to contact me.

CONTACT ME

Corporate & Military Leadership Seminars

Help your company, group, or organization become a high performance team that delivers massive results.

Learn more

SPEAKING

Ryan is a dynamic speaker known for unique presentations that change your audience’s neurochemistry and leave them inspired and empowered.

Book Ryan for your next event

F*ck Your Feelings Gear & Signed Books

RECENT POSTS

Follow @ryanmunsey_ on Instagram

It’s only dangerous if you don’t know what you’re doing.  Or is it?  Risk is a tricky thing, and in some instances impossible to eliminate completely, but it’s not impossible to navigate.  Let’s look at driving.  There is a certain level of risk involved in driving your car across town today (and everyday) no matter how good of a driver you are – or how high your car’s safety rating.  But how does that risk change if we’re distracted? (You know, using our phone for directions while talking and trying to take a sunset photo?) And how does that risk change again if this time we trust that same daily commute to your 11-year-old nephew?  Due to his lack of knowledge – and experience – the risk level of riding in the same car, on the same roads, at the same time of day, significantly increases.  The takeaway: certain variables dramatically increase or reduce the risk involved in every situation.  When we sense risk, dig deeper.  Why do certain situations, scenarios, or decisions seem riskier than others? How can these answers serve us?  Usually, our lack of experience or expertise increases the associated risk. (See: 11-year-olds driving cars)  If awareness is the first step, then the second step is to identify our own gaps that make these scenarios seem high risk, then do the work required to close those gaps.  Like you’ve (hopefully) done to mitigate the risk of being behind the wheel of hunk of metal hurtling almost 100 feet per second, it’s time to learn, accumulate reps, and work towards a level of mastery that significantly shifts the odds of a favorable outcome in your favor.  Risk is inevitable. How we identify and prepare for it determines how it will effect us.  As the Navy SEALs say, “we don’t rise to the level of our expectations, we fall to our level of preparation.” LISTEN to today’s episode of BHP Shorts (Understanding Risk) for more.
.
bit.ly/betterhumanproject or wherever you listen to podcasts.
.
#bebetter #dobetter #growth #mindset #development #risk #awareness #choice #preparation #nature #outdoors #adventure #life #uncertainty #fear
It’s only dangerous if you don’t know what you’re doing. Or is it? Risk is a tricky thing, and in some instances impossible to eliminate completely, but it’s not impossible to navigate. Let’s look at driving. There is a certain level of risk involved in driving your car across town today (and everyday) no matter how good of a driver you are – or how high your car’s safety rating. But how does that risk change if we’re distracted? (You know, using our phone for directions while talking and trying to take a sunset photo?) And how does that risk change again if this time we trust that same daily commute to your 11-year-old nephew? Due to his lack of knowledge – and experience – the risk level of riding in the same car, on the same roads, at the same time of day, significantly increases. The takeaway: certain variables dramatically increase or reduce the risk involved in every situation. When we sense risk, dig deeper. Why do certain situations, scenarios, or decisions seem riskier than others? How can these answers serve us? Usually, our lack of experience or expertise increases the associated risk. (See: 11-year-olds driving cars) If awareness is the first step, then the second step is to identify our own gaps that make these scenarios seem high risk, then do the work required to close those gaps. Like you’ve (hopefully) done to mitigate the risk of being behind the wheel of hunk of metal hurtling almost 100 feet per second, it’s time to learn, accumulate reps, and work towards a level of mastery that significantly shifts the odds of a favorable outcome in your favor. Risk is inevitable. How we identify and prepare for it determines how it will effect us. As the Navy SEALs say, “we don’t rise to the level of our expectations, we fall to our level of preparation.” LISTEN to today’s episode of BHP Shorts (Understanding Risk) for more. . bit.ly/betterhumanproject or wherever you listen to podcasts. . #bebetter #dobetter #growth #mindset #development #risk #awareness #choice #preparation #nature #outdoors #adventure #life #uncertainty #fear